Archeologist Digs Into Remains of No Man’s Sky Abandoned Player Civilization

Archeologist Digs Into Remains of No Man’s Sky Abandoned Player Civilization

When No Man’s Sky launched last year, an archaeology PhD student led a team of 30 players on a survey intending to understand the algorithms that built the game’s worlds. This initial foray didn’t pan out, as the game was missing features he needed to properly excavate. But after the 1.3 update, which radically altered No Man’s Sky’s planet generation, he’s not only gotten better tools to dig with, but also an abandoned civilization to explore.

“My whole reason for existence as an archaeologist these days is to find out how to do archaeology in a synthetic world,” Andrew Reinhard told me over Skype. He studies history through excavating artifacts, and though he once specialized in Greek vase painting, he’s now a PhD student at the University of York in the UK, where he works with their Center for Digital Heritage. While a lot of people think of archaeology something tangible and physical, Reinhard says that for him, video games themselves are archaeological sites. “They’re made by people for other people,” he said. “Games change over time with different versions just like sites change over time.” Using the methodology of archaeology in a digital, non-physical space like a video game is the backbone of his research.

Reinhard and his team were all pretty excited for No Man’s Sky to launch, both as academics and as players. They had made plans for how they would begin to try to survey the sites, doing field walks and flyovers to look at the landscape. But as the team got into the game, they realized that the tools they needed just weren’t there. At launch the game didn’t have cardinal directions on the compass, so getting his team members to the same spots on planet was incredibly difficult. Over time, his group of 30 dwindled off to work on their own projects, PhDs, or returned to their lives.

Months later, Reinhard decided to return for the latest update, patch 1.3. New tools, like the terraforming gun, allow him to more easily manipulate the terrain, and now that the game has cardinal directions, field walking should be much easier. Reinhard has one more exciting new development as well—No Man’s Sky had gained abandoned civilizations like the Galactic Hub. The Galactic Hub was a player directed project that seeks to create and organized community for players to more or less call home, and was first settled in the Lennon star system of the Euclid galaxy. The original site for the No Man’s Sky Galactic Hub project had been radically altered by patch 1.3, which changed how planets were generated. The community was forced to leave their bases, farms and communication terminals behind, which Reinhard intends to excavate just like any other civilization.

When he first landed, he followed a pop up that should have pointed him to a shared base, as well as a couple dozen communication terminals with messages from former Hub residents. When he landed there was no base to be found, and Reinhard theorized it must be underground. So, he started digging.

“What I discovered through tunneling is that the base and the two dozen communication terminals are buried under the bedrock, which the Terrain Manipulator cannot cut through,” he wrote in a blog post. “I attempted to tunnel to other nearby terminals, but it’s clear that these are under the bedrock, too. So while I can pinpoint the locations of these terminals and of the base, I will never be able to read what they say or identify who left them.”

While excavating the Legacy Hub is exciting, Reinhard also describes it as eerie. Player bases have defaulted to a single round building.

Image Source: Andrew Reinhard CC-BY

Shared bases have retained their architecture, but they’re just creepily empty, like a base he discovered made by a player called dwshort.

“I’d never seen [a shared base] in the wild before, so finding dwshort’s base was a revelation. It’s beautiful, clean, and stocked with a renewable, sustainable cash-crop. But the lights were on and no one was home,” Reinhard said. Furthermore, although he’d been greeted with a welcome message the first time he’d visited dwshort’s base, when he’d returned the next day that message was gone, and had reverted to the default. “To lose such a simple human connection was sad, but it’s unclear if it was intentional or accidental,” Reinhard said.

Nearby, he also found a grouping of Communication Terminals in the air. Players can’t place objects like that in the air however—what he was actually looking at was the outline of a now lost mountain. The messages on the Communication Terminals even referenced climbing. “It is clear that these terminals mark the previous disposition of the planet’s landscape prior to v1.3, and even gives a hint to the shape,” Reinhard wrote. “There used to be a mountain here, but now it is only sand.”

Image Source: Andrew Reinhard CC-BY

It’s early days for this second attempt at excavating No Man’s Sky, but Reinhard’s writings are quite optimistic. “The results of today’s initial explorations of planet Pr might mark the first in-game excavation of a human-player settlement buried by a catastrophic event that had consequences unintended by the game’s developer,” he wrote after his first look at the the Legacy Hub. For now, Reinhard is making a new mission plan and dividing up the planets in the Legacy Hub between himself and the rest of the team. Who knows what else they’ll find, buried beneath the digital bedrock?

Source: Kotaku

Leave a reply

About The Author

Christiana Polycarpou

Communicatios Officer

Upcoming Events

Jul
4
Wed
all-day World Congress on Dance Research
World Congress on Dance Research
Jul 4 – Jul 8 all-day
You are invited to showcase your work at the Dance Research Congress. This unique event is open to all forms of dance: ballet, modern, folk, ballroom, Oriental, tango, therapeutic, recreational, revival etc. Venue is the[...]
Jul
5
Thu
all-day #EARTH2018 Digital Environments ...
#EARTH2018 Digital Environments ...
Jul 5 – Jul 7 all-day
#EARTH2018 Digital Environments for Education, Arts and Heritage
INTERNATIONAL AND INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE Download the program here For more information and registrations click here
Jul
6
Fri
all-day FutureFest 2018 @ Tobacco Dock
FutureFest 2018 @ Tobacco Dock
Jul 6 – Jul 7 all-day
Occupy the future at FutureFest 2018 FutureFest, one of Europe’s largest festivals of the future, invites you on a breath-taking journey designed to explore how the most pressing challenges of our time could be tackled[...]
Jul
10
Tue
all-day “Electronic Visualisation and th... @ British Computing Society offices, a central London venue near Covent Garden.
“Electronic Visualisation and th... @ British Computing Society offices, a central London venue near Covent Garden.
Jul 10 – Jul 12 all-day
"Electronic Visualisation and the  Arts" - EVA London 2018 @ British Computing Society offices, a central London venue near Covent Garden.
We are excited to announce that the EVA London 2018 conference will take place from Tuesday 10th July – Thursday 12th July 2018. In addition, there will be a Pre-Conference Symposium on Monday 9th July 2018[...]
Aug
12
Sun
all-day “45th SIGGRAPH Conference on Co...
“45th SIGGRAPH Conference on Co...
Aug 12 – Aug 16 all-day
"45th SIGGRAPH Conference on  Computer Graphics and  Interactive Techniques"
SIGGRAPH 2018 is a five-day immersion into the latest innovations in CG, Animation, VR, Games, Digital Art, Mixed Reality and Emerging Technologies. Experience research, hands-on demos, and fearless acts of collaboration. For more information click[...]
Sep
5
Wed
all-day 24th Annual Meeting of the Euro...
24th Annual Meeting of the Euro...
Sep 5 – Sep 8 all-day
24th Annual Meeting of  the European Association of Archaeologists- EAA2018
Barcelona has been an urban laboratory since the high Medieval Ages. A place of diversity, a backdrop for  a multiplicity of social and cultural processes on multiple scales that reflect different ways of constructing the[...]
all-day EAA 2018 Annual Meeting in Barce... @ Faculty of Geography and History
EAA 2018 Annual Meeting in Barce... @ Faculty of Geography and History
Sep 5 – Sep 9 all-day
The EAA Annual Meeting, Barcelona proposes six main themes for discussion, all of them with a focus on thinking from within the framework of Archaeology and Archaeological Heritage about our future.Themes The Annual Meeting themes,[...]
Sep
24
Mon
all-day Communicating the Museum – CTM18...
Communicating the Museum – CTM18...
Sep 24 – Sep 27 all-day
Communicating the Museum – CTM18 Chicago
The Communicating the Museum (CTM) conference will travel to Chicago from 24 to 27 September 2018. Chicago’ leading cultural institutions will host the 21st edition of CTM, the rendez-vous for communication professionals working in the[...]
Sep
29
Sat
all-day CIDOC Annual Conference
CIDOC Annual Conference
Sep 29 – Oct 4 all-day
CIDOC Annual Conference
CIDOC organises an annual conference which typically incorporates: Plenary sessions with papers and reports on documentation issues and initiatives Workshops and tutorials on specific issues Working Group sessions during which members of the Groups pursue[...]
10:00 CIDOC 2018: Provenance of Knowledge @ Heraklion
CIDOC 2018: Provenance of Knowledge @ Heraklion
Sep 29 @ 10:00 – Oct 4 @ 16:30
CIDOC 2018: Provenance of Knowledge @ Heraklion
The ‘Provenance of Knowledge’ is a core element of good practice in documentation and so is the theme of the next annual CIDOC conference, in Heraklion from 29 September to 4 October 2018. As an[...]
REGISTER NOW!